Workshop on future of Offline Web Applications

12 09 2011

W3C just announced an upcoming workshop on one of the key aspects of the development and deployment of Web applications, in particular on mobile devices: the ability to install them and keep them working while offline.

The workshop aims at identifying a clear path forward for innovation in the Open Web Platform related to offline Web application invocation and use.

The workshop will be held on November 5 2011, hosted by Vodafone in Redwood city in California, right after the W3C annual TPAC week of meetings in Santa Clara.

If you want to contribute to the discussions, please submit a position paper by September 30, as described in the call for participation.





Standards for Web Applications on Mobile: Current state and roadmap

5 09 2011

Back in February, I announced the start of a series of updates for a standardization roadmap for Web applications on mobile devices, a compilation of the most relevant current and upcoming technologies to develop Web applications well-fitted to mobile devices, which was again updated in May 2011.

Standardization roadmap preview

As the project reaches the end of its first year, I have now just released a more complete version of that roadmap, with perspectives on what’s coming up over the course of the next year.

It also takes into account the latest changes in this space, with new drafts from the Web performance Working Group, a new charter for the Device APIs group, an early editors draft for Web Real-Time communications and much more.

This document is extracted from the equivalent page in the W3C wiki, where contributions from the larger community are more than welcomed. Many thanks to those who already contributed to it!

The next smaller iteration of this document will be provided end of November. Stay tuned!





Standards for Web Applications on Mobile: May 2011 update

31 05 2011

Three months ago, I announced a first version of our standardization roadmap for Web applications on mobile devices, a compilation of the most relevant current and upcoming technologies to develop Web applications well-fitted to mobile devices.

As announced then, I am now releasing an updated version of that roadmap that takes into account the most recent changes and events in the W3C Web platform, including the creation of new Working Groups (Audio and Real-Time Communications), new work items started by existing groups, proposed new items for existing groups, etc.

This document is now extracted from the equivalent page in the W3C wiki, where contributions from the larger community are more than welcomed. Many thanks to those who already contributed to this updated version!

The next iteration of this document will be provided end of August, and will include also a first gap analysis of missing features in the Web platform, based on the our series of interviews, and in general, feedback from the community at large. Stay tuned!





When the Web calls in. Hello Sidney.

6 05 2011

Scream posterCould Scream movie characters rely solely on Web standards? Impossible… as of today! There is no standard way to make phone calls from your Web browser without having to install a plugin or some other proprietary artifact. Things are about to change though.

W3C just announced the Web Real-Time Communications Working Group (or Web RTC WG), chartered to define client-side APIs to enable Real-Time Communications in Web browsers. In short and clear, the group is to enable audio/video calls directly from within your Web browser, using inter-operable technologies.

As for audio, this exciting work is certain to benefit mobile phones be it only because these devices have been intended for calls from the very beginning. On top of shooting a Web standard friendly sequel to Scream, combining mobile devices, social networks and real-time communications opens up a myriad of possibilities, so get ready for an evermore immersive and connected experience!

The Web RTC group got created as a result of exploration discussions at the RTC Web Workshop back in October 2010. It will work in close relationship with the IETF Real-Time Communication WEB group to ensure compatibility between the API functions that the W3C group will work on and the Profile that the IETF group will define.

Instructions to join the group are available.





The Web in full stereo

6 04 2011

A couple weeks ago, W3C announced the creation of a new Working Group, the Audio Working Group.

This group has been chartered to bring more advanced audio capabilities to the Web platform.

HTML5 already provides a useful <audio> element, with a scriptable interface to control how audio resources can be played.

The additional APIs that this new group will develop adds capabilities to process and synthetize audio streams in JavaScript.

This work is based on exploration work made in the W3C Audio Incubator Group, and some early experimental implementations of related APIs are already available in Firefox and Chrome.

As their etymology indicates, phones have historically been primarily sound-based devices, and this new work on improving the audio capabilities of the Web is certain to benefit mobile devices. In particular, the role of audio in games (a big part of the applications space on mobile devices) makes this work really exciting.

You can follow the work of the group in its microblog on Identi.ca or Twitter.





W3C Accelerometer and Gyroscope APIs

8 03 2011

As the W3C Geolocation Working Group is putting the last touches on the Geolocation API, the new charter of the group was officially approved yesterday.

That new charter adds two new specifications to the group roadmap:

  • a second version of the Geolocation API that includes additional information, e.g. civic addesses; an editors draft of that specification is already available;
  • a DeviceOrientation Event specification which provides information on the orientation of the device — in other words, it makes it possible to react to accelerometer and gyroscopes changes from within the Web environment; an editors draft of that API is also available, and is known to be already implemented in some mobile browsers (e.g. iOS 4.2+ Safari).

For those interested, please see how to join that group.





Towards a W3C Mobile Web Applications Standardization Roadmap

24 02 2011

The objectives of the MobiWebApp European research project that W3C is leading include disseminating knowledge of the current work inside W3C that facilitate the creation of mobile Web applications, as well as building a standardization roadmap that identifies the gap in the current standardization landscape.

I have just published an important first step in that direction: the Mobile Web Applications standards: February 2011 current state and roadmap represents a first attempt at compiling all the mobile-relevant Web applications technologies in development in W3C.

It is a work in progress, a picture of the current state that I plan to update regularly, probably every three months.

It has not received wide review yet, so the data it includes should be taken with caution, since it likely contain mistakes that will be fixed based on the feedback we receive.

Please send bug reports, suggestions, and general feedback to dom@w3.org, and I’ll do my best to integrate it in the next version of the document.